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You cannot manage what you cannot measure, so if calculating a carbon footprint for your business isn’t on your list of priorities already, it should be.

An understanding of your business’s carbon footprint is the first and most important step of your sustainability journey. Having this information leads to successful carbon reduction outcomes because it allows you to:

 

The carbon footprint process

 

There are a few different methodologies used to calculate the carbon footprint of a business. The two most popular are the GHG Protocol Corporate Standard and ISO 14064. In both methodologies, one of the first things you need to do is set your organisational boundaries. The organisational boundaries essentially dictate what share of responsibility the organisation will take for emissions from certain areas of the business’s structure. This is particularly relevant to subsidiaries, parent companies, partially owned operations, and joint ventures.

The next crucial step in the business carbon footprint process is to identify which emission sources you are going to measure. In both the GHG Protocol Corporate Standard and ISO 14064 methodologies, measuring scope 1 and 2 emissions is mandatory, while scope 3 is recommended but optional. You can learn more about the three scopes here.

scope 1, 2, 3 diagram

Once emission sources have been identified, the data for each must be collected. This data is referred to as activity data. For certain sources, collecting this data will be as simple as referencing invoices. However, some sources will be more complicated and may not be able to be measured in your first footprint, as they cannot be collected retroactively.

Calculating the business carbon footprint requires the data from your emission sources (activity data) and emission factors, which are also referred to as conversion factors. Emission factors are produced annually by organisations such as DEFRA and allow you to convert your activity data into tonnes of CO2e (tCO2e). CO2e refers to carbon dioxide and equivalents and is the standard unit of measurement for greenhouse gasses. This is because the different greenhouse gasses cause different levels of damage to our planet (these impacts are referred to as global warming potentials [GWP]) and therefore a standard unit of measurement is needed to equate their impacts.

Example carbon footprint report

When the calculations are complete and have been verified, the carbon footprint is best presented through a report. A business carbon footprint report will usually include graphics, tables, and diagrams depicting how the footprint is split between different aspects of the business’s operations. Some frameworks, such as our Environmental Business Operations Framework, provide benchmarking data in carbon footprint reports, which allows you to compare your footprint to those of other businesses in your industry.

Calculating a carbon footprint for your business is the most crucial step in your sustainability journey. Get started now with our Environmental Business Operations Framework.

 

written by sylvie

 

 

 

“How can my business be more sustainable?”. If you have ever wondered this, you’re not alone. Countless companies across the globe are attempting to green their operations; however, the failure rate for business sustainability initiatives is surprisingly high. In fact, according to research by Bain & Company, the failure rate is around 98%.

The first step towards making your own business more sustainable is understanding the factors behind this daunting statistic. This is important to do as it allows you to learn from the mistakes of others and enter the sustainability space prepared, educated, and much more likely to succeed.

 

Sustainable business mistake No 1: Lack of senior leadership support

 

A lack of senior leadership support makes it all the more difficult for companies to overcome barriers to meaningful change. In fact, the greatest factor of the success of sustainability initiatives is support from senior leadership. Involvement from the executive-level not only provides momentum for the sustainability journey, it also allows for large-scale and impactful actions to take place. Senior leadership have the authority to make tough decisions in the name of sustainability, such as changing supply-chains, which can quickly drive the organisation towards success.

 

Sustainable business mistake No 2: Failing to make a public commitment

 

Many executives are reluctant to publicly share sustainability targets and commitments, fearing the negative impacts that should incur if they fail. However, making public commitments featuring quantitative targets is actually a key predictor of success in sustainability initiatives. This is, in part, because of the sense of commitment and accountability that is created, ensuring that the sustainability initiatives are given proper attention and prioritisation.

 

Sustainable business mistake No 3: Staff scepticism and prioritisation

 

Many managers and employees are sceptical to the importance of sustainability initiatives, considering them non-essential to business. Therefore, sustainability efforts fall to the bottom of the staff’s to-do list, especially when their time is already stretched thin. While staff’s scepticism towards these initiatives can be remedied through education, especially of the links between sustainable processes and business success, it is also important that proper time is allocated to employees taking on the sustainability work as well as their usual roles.

 

Sustainable business mistake No 4: Failure to embed sustainability into the organisations’ DNA

 

When sustainability is not embedded into the core processes, incentives, and accountability systems of a business, initiatives will all but certainly fail. Successful organisations hold managers responsible for delivering key sustainability results and offer monetary incentives to reward sustainability performance. They also address sustainability with the same level of importance as other core KPIs, ensuring processes of sustainability measurement, management, and reporting are afforded proper time and attention.

 

So, what can we learn from these mistakes and how can we avoid making them?:

 

1. Involve senior leadership in as much of the process as possible.

 

This can be done by ensuring senior leadership are present during initiative meetings and regularly updated on any progress, problems, or successes by the sustainability team.

 

2. Keep yourself accountable and committed by making public, target-based commitments.

 

In order to make target-based commitments, some level of measurement is required. A carbon footprint audit is a brilliant way to do this, and allows you to easily make comparisons and communicate improvement. We offer carbon footprint audits both through our Environmental Business Operations Framework (EBOF) and consultancy work.

 

3. Educate staff from all levels on the importance of sustainability, and allow them the time to focus on sustainability initiatives.

 

Educating staff on what the sustainability initiative is, why the company is doing it, what it entails, and what the impact of it will be can really help staff to get on board. As part of our EBOF, we can lead presentations to staff on sustainability issues to facilitate engagement and enthusiasm within the team.

 

4. Embed sustainability into the core processes, incentives, and accountability systems of the business.

 

Sustainability should be regarded with the same level of importance as other core KPIs, ensuring processes of sustainability measurement, management, and reporting are afforded proper time and attention. In order for this to happen, all of the above teachings need to be incorporated and continually followed.

 

ESI Monitor’s Environmental Business Operations Framework helps businesses of any sector or size to become sustainable through measurement, minimisation, and management of their environmental output. The framework is designed to ensure sustainability is embedded into the business’s DNA, allows target-based commitments to be made, and educates staff on sustainability issues.

It also allows you to:

Measure your footprint across scopes one, two, and three using our online data collection module and receive an informative carbon footprint report showing you where your emissions come from.

Compare your footprint against those of other companies in your industry through our benchmarking data.

Commit to international sustainability targets and develop your own environmental policies.

Minimise your impact by using our step-by-step guidance resources.

Build a consciousness of continual improvement and set up systems and commitments that allow for these processes to continue effectively.

Receive verification of your footprint and achieve our award, which can be displayed on your website, and a certificate.

 

Learn more…

 

We are pleased to announce that ARM has enrolled in ESI Monitor’s Environmental Business Operations Framework.

Through enrolling, ARM has shown a great commitment to achieving environmental sustainability. This also marks the start of an exciting journey for ARM, where they will soon be able to expertly measure, manage, and minimise their environmental impact.

It’s great to see more businesses put sustainability and climate change on their agendas. Well done!

 

Environmental Business Operations Framework

ESI Monitor’s Environmental Business Operations Framework is structured as an environmental management system that allows businesses of any sector or size to measure, manage, minimise, and continually improve its operational environmental footprint.

Achieving the Environmental Business Operations Framework demonstrates to customers, staff, and business partners that the organisation:

You can learn more about the Environmental Business Operations Framework and how your business can get involved here.

You have probably seen the terms Scope 1, Scope 2, and Scope 3 thrown around by now but, what do they mean and why are they used?

Image showing scope 1, scope 2, and scope 3 activities

The scopes are used to categorise emissions when measuring a carbon footprint. They differentiate between indirect and direct emission sources, which helps to improve accuracy and transparency in the footprinting process, and enables organisations to set clear goals and targets.

 

Scope 1

 

Scope 1 emissions are the direct result of activities that occur from owned or controlled sources. Some examples of Scope 1 emission activities include:

The key factor in determining Scope 1 emissions is the directness of emissions. Looking at the example above; driving a company owned vehicle to and from clients is a Scope 1 emission activity because the travel is a direct part of the company’s operations. On the other hand, driving your own car to and from your place of employment is not a Scope 1 emission activity, but is a Scope 3 activity. This is because employees travelling to and from work is not a direct aspect of the company’s operations, meaning emissions that occur from this activity are indirect.

 

Scope 2

 

Scope 2 emissions occur as a result of the indirect consumption of energy and are usually understood as the purchases of electricity, heat, or steam directly from a third-party supplier. Above, we looked at burning coal onsite to generate electricity as a Scope 1 emission activity. If another organisation purchased their electricity from the site in the example, the purchasing organisation would be responsible for the share of emissions that their energy took to produce. However, these emissions would be considered Scope 2. This is because the purchasing organisation did not directly produce the emissions, but they are an indirect result of them purchasing the energy.

 

Scope 3

 

Scope 3 emissions cover all other indirect emissions that are not covered in Scope 2. These emissions are usually split into the following categories:

In most reporting frameworks, it is not mandatory to report Scope 3 emissions. This is primarily because Scope 3 emissions are more difficult to accurately measure, report, and benchmark than Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions. However, there is a lot of value in measuring some aspects of your Scope 3 emissions, as they can provide you with valuable insights into how your operations indirectly affect your environment.

 

Through ESI Monitor’s Environmental Business Operations Framework you can:

 

Learn more…

 

 

 

We are so excited to announce that Ronez has achieved ESI Monitor’s Environmental Business Operations award for the year of 2021.

The award was given to Ronez following their completion of ESI Monitor’s Environmental Business Operations Framework (EBOF), and recognises the dedication to environmental sustainability the company has demonstrated through the process.

Using the EBOF, Ronez has been able to measure a base year carbon footprint, which will be used for comparisons as they continue to record their footprint in future years across scope one, two, and three emissions.

ESI Monitor’s Fred Betley explained to Channel Eye: “Ronez’s base year footprint of 37.52 tonnes of CO2e per employee is already considerably lower than the footprints of similar companies in our benchmark sample. We expect Ronez to become leaders of sustainability in their industry over the coming years, as their ongoing footprint minimisation plans deliver improvements”.

Emissions measured in Ronez’s base year contain all scope one and scope two emissions with a scope three measurement of water usage. The breadth of scope three measurement will increase as the company continues its sustainability journey.

Through the framework, Ronez has also been able to commit to international sustainability targets; create and enact action plans to reduce their environmental impact; and set up systems of continual improvement. ESI Monitor founder Marc Laine said “The EBOF is very thorough and ensures that sustainability is embedded within the participating organisations’ DNA”.

Ronez’ Director Steve Roussel said: “As a business we are committed to using scarce resources in a responsible and sustainable way and on minimising the impact of our operations on both the local and global environment. We have found using ESI Monitor’s Environmental Business Operations Framework extremely helpful as a tool for measuring our carbon footprint and setting targets for future reductions in our use of energy and other resources.”

Building upon the work carried out in Guernsey, Ronez has now enrolled the operations in Jersey into the ESI Monitor scheme as well.

Ronez’ Managing Director, Mike Osborne added: “Having seen how using the Environmental Business Operations Framework has helped in setting clear sustainability objectives in our Guernsey operations we are keen to roll it out in Jersey as well.”

POS Interiors has made a great step towards sustainable business practices and the mitigation of climate change by enrolling in ESI Monitor’s Environmental Business Operations Framework. POS Interiors will now be able to expertly measure, manage, and minimise their environmental impact.

It’s great to see more businesses put sustainability and climate change on their agendas. Well done!

 

Environmental Business Operations Framework

ESI Monitor’s Environmental Business Operations Framework is structured as an environmental management system that allows businesses of any sector or size to measure, manage, minimise, and continually improve its operational environmental footprint.

Achieving the Environmental Business Operations Framework demonstrates to customers, staff, and business partners that the organisation:

You can learn more about the Environmental Business Operations Award and how your business can get involved here.

 

The most effective way for businesses improve their ESG performance and fight climate change is by implementing accountability – from grass roots to board level – in order to measure and mark their carbon footprint journey, according to Marc Lainé, Managing Director of ESI Monitor.

Standard advice and changes made in daily company culture aimed at improving sustainability, while important, do not work in isolation. Even setting up an ESG committee, introducing initiatives and adopting a framework can fail to make significant progress if there is no public commitment, no quantitative indicators, no integration into the company’s DNA and no involvement from the board.

 

“ESG and sustainability need to become truly embedded into a company’s DNA”

 

Environmental, social and governance factors and sustainability need to become truly embedded into a company’s DNA. Despite best intentions, sustainability is often the first thing pushed aside when people are too busy meeting deadlines for other priorities and therefore progress becomes slower than originally anticipated.

According to the Bain & Co, Cox Conserves Sustainability Survey, over 60% of businesses see costs as a major obstacle to sustainability programmes and less than 25% of employees say they are held accountable for sustainability through incentives. Furthermore, over 60% of businesses consider limited human resources as a problem so it’s no surprise that 98% of corporate sustainability programmes fail.

Without measurement and targets to meet, there are no consequences for inaction.

 

Carbon footprint report

 

The most effective way to ensure sustainability is to embed at the core of a company’s culture the need to report, benchmark and set targets with involvement from the board. It is vital to use quantitative progress indicators to measure development and commit publicly to be held accountable.

One way of achieving this is by completing a base-year carbon footprint report and follow it up annually. A base year is a reference point from the past that current emissions can be compared to.

This way, boards can make their own decisions based on the results and aim to improve their organisation’s carbon footprint report year-on-year. With targets and reporting, this ensures that the company is accountable to achieving these targets – or it risks reputational damage if they remain undelivered.

Essentially, you can’t manage what you can’t measure. So measure your base year emissions, provide your board with a benchmarked report and get them involved with making commitments for targets. With this implemented you will now have an empowered ESG committee and public engagement to propel your business forward and meet your targets.

 

Why is tracking carbon emissions important for ESG?

 

Scientists predict that if we continue the way we are, then by the year 2100 global temperatures will increase by up to 3.9 degrees according to the Climate Action Tracker. Even if we can meet optimistic targets it is likely that we will still fail to meet the Paris Agreement goals of 1.5 degrees by 2050 – and warming above this temperature will have dire consequences for our planet.

At 1.5 degrees, 14% of the population will be exposed to regular severe heatwaves. At 2 degrees, this increases to 37%. At 2 degrees we will also see more deaths from vector-borne diseases and extreme heat, larger scale economic damages, mass migration and increased food scarcity.

This impacts businesses as policies and sanctions to combat emitters can be costly and the reputational risk for companies that don’t transition to greener practice is significant.

Therefore it’s critical that we do all we can and businesses need to position their ESG and sustainability practice to the top of the priority pile, implementing practices effectively as well as communicating these measures.

 

Our ESG responsibility

 

It is down to businesses and companies to lead the way. According to the 5WPR 2020 Consumer Culture Report, 83% of millennials believe it’s important to use companies that share their values – and the majority of this demographic care about ESG approaches.

In 2020, the UK’s business sector was responsible for 59 million tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions. People look for companies that make an active, transparent effort to reduce their contribution to the statistics and destruction of our planet.

Change is possible and by implementing a strong strategy based on reporting and benchmarking, you will position your company to be leading the way in sustainability and elevate public opinion – which in turn leads to business success.

For any information about frameworks and reporting please get in touch with ESI Monitor.


 

Article originally published by Channel Eye

 

Cleland & Co has made an inspiring step towards sustainable business practices and the mitigation of climate change by enrolling in ESI Monitor’s Environmental Business Operations Framework. This marks the start of an exciting journey for Cleland & Co, where they will soon be able to expertly measure, manage, and minimise their environmental impact.

It’s great to see more businesses put sustainability and climate change on their agendas. Well done!

 

Environmental Business Operations Framework

ESI Monitor’s Environmental Business Operations Framework is structured as an environmental management system that allows businesses of any sector or size to measure, manage, minimise, and continually improve its operational environmental footprint.

Completing the framework demonstrates to customers, staff, and business partners that the organisation:

You can learn more about the Environmental Business Operations Framework and how your business can get involved here.

 

Bellerive Trust has made an important commitment towards environmental sustainability by enrolling in ESI Monitor’s Environmental Business Operations Framework. Soon, Bellerive Trust will be able to expertly measure, manage, and minimise its environmental impact.

It’s great to see another business put sustainability and climate change on their agenda. Well done guys!

 

Environmental Business Operations Framework

ESI Monitor’s Environmental Business Operations Framework is structured as an environmental management system that allows businesses of any sector or size to measure, manage, minimise, and continually improve its operational environmental footprint.

Completing the framework demonstrates to customers, staff, and business partners that the organisation:

You can learn more about the Environmental Business Operations Framework and how your business can get involved here.

 

 

We are delighted to announce that Resolution IT has achieved ESI Monitor’s Community Champion Award!

In achieving the award, Resolution IT has demonstrated a great commitment to helping their local community, with regards to financial donations, time contributions, and in-kind donations.

At ESI Monitor, we are strong believers that when businesses are involved in the community, everybody benefits, and would like to thank the team at Resolution IT for embodying this principle.

 

Learn more about the Community Champion Award